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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
now. >> you were shocked when you heard that president obama had named mary jo white to lead the securities and exchange commission. and you wrote that she was a partner in a law firm that represented a lot of these big banks. you know, bank of america, goldman sachs, chase, aig, morgan stanley. you said, "she dropped out and made the move a lot of regulators make, leaving government to make bucket loads of money, working for the people she used to police." and i gather your great concern is that you don't want to see the country's top financial cop being indebted to the people who created the bank roe? >> right. yeah, absolutely. i mean, it's just simple common sense. i mean, you're sitting on $10 million, $15 million, however much money she made working there at debevoise and plimpton when she was a partner and you owe that money to this specific group of clients and now you're in charge of policing them, just psychologically think of that. it doesn't really work, you know? it doesn't really work in terms of how aggressive a prosecutor should be, what his attitude towards t
in djibouti. u.s. drone attacks ordered by obama have spiked particularly in yemen, somalia, afghanistan, and notably pakistan where over 360 drone strikes over the nine years, 2004 to 2013, have killed over 3,000 people. this data is not classified. and not even secret. but it is troubling. so troubling that the u.n. has just decided to launch an investigation on the impacts of drone strikes on thousands of civilians. question. will the u.n. human rights council rule that drone use violates international law do you think, pat buchanan? >> i don't think they l. if they do, john, it doesn't make any difference. but we really ought to be concerned about these drones. they're a tremendously effective weapon. they save our pilots and the rest of it. but the collateral damage, the killing of civilians, the killing of children, the tremendous alienation they've increased all over this region has resulted in al-qaida frankly getting a tremendous number of new recruits. are we recruiting more enemies than we're killing? that's the key question when you look to see how al-qaida is no longer just
abroad. in response, top officials in the obama administration argued their actions are justified and legal. >> primary concern is to keep the american people safe, now do so in a way that's consistent with our laws and our values. >> ifill: attorney general eric holder today defended the justice department's rationale for authorizing the killings of americans overseas. >> we are -- we have as a basis for action that we take a congressional statute that allows us to operate against al qaeda and associated entities not only in pakistan or not only in afghanistan but in other parts of the world. we say that we only take these kinds of actions when there's an imminent threat, when capture is not feasible and when we are confident that we're doing so in a they's consistent with a federal international law. >> ifill: nbc news obtained a 16-page justice department white paper apparently prepared for congressional committees last summer that describes the obama administration's legal reasoning the document said a lethal operation is legal if it targets a senior operational leader of al q
the obamas team was second rate. what did you mean? >> i'm very, very concerned about what i see happening, charlie, in the national security arena. i think the administration's policies are terribly flawed. i think the damage they're doing to the department is enormous with the sequester. i think the president's performance, by my standards, in the international arena, the middle east and so forth, is worse than many of my friends and colleagues see his domestic policies. i see him heading for the exits in the middle east, getting out of iraq, no follow on agreement, getting out of afghanistan as quickly as he can. jawboning the iranians on the nuclear program. >> rose: is it a problem with the president and his policies or is it with chuck hagel, john brennan, john kerry? >> it's all the president. the president picks the people that he puts around him, too. with respect to chuck hagel and brennan, defense and c.i.a. just in the last week, their performance in front of the committees that have to confirm them has been pretty poor and that's not my judgment, that's the judgment of senator
, in washington, there are new revelations of a split within the obama administration about what should be done about the conflict. ray suarez reports. >> suarez: it was a short moment in a long hearing devoted to another topic, and it yielded a surprising set of answers from defense secretary leon panetta, and the joint chiefs chairman, general martin dempsey. arizona republican john mccain asked about a report that president obama rejected a proposal to arm syrian rebels last summer. >> did you support the recommendation by secretary of state... then secretary of state clinton and then head of c.i.a. general petraeus that we provide weapons to the resistance in syria? did you support that? >> we did. >> you did support that. >> we did. >> suarez: so far, the president's judgment has been that things won't get better with american arms. instead, he's warned the weapons might fall into the hands of extremist elements, a concern reiterated today by the new secretary of state, who was asked about the deliberations last year. >> i don't know what the discussions were in the white house and i'm not
no other home. gwen: speaking at a democrats' retreat yesterday, president obama also turned his attention to fissures within his own party. >> bottom line is this, people. we got a lot of work to do. what we've learned over the last four years, at least what i've learned over the last four years is that it won't be smooth. it won't be simple. there will be frustrations. there will be times where you guys are mad at me and i'll occasionally read about it. gwen: bottom line, people, they're all laughing about being mad at the president. that only happens once every four years. so are the strategies we're beginning to see emerge on both sides? >> absolutely. one of the things that i think president obama took away from the campaign, keep campaigning, campaigning to govern. he is very much organizing not only his legislative agenda, domestic agenda, but certainly the techniques of campaigning to try to do that. to work against or with congress by using campaign techniques. we are seeing him talk about, you know, there may be divisions you may not like, but stick together, if we stick together
," and susan crawford served for a time as a special assistant to president obama for science, technology and innovation. right now she teaches communications law at the benjamin cardozo school of law here in new york city and is a fellow at the roosevelt institute. susan crawford, welcome. >> thank you so much. >> "captive audience?" who's the captive? >> us, all of us. what's happened is that these enormous telecommunications companies, comcast and time warner on the wired side, verizon and at&t on the wireless side, have divided up markets, put themselves in the position where they're subject to no competition and no oversight from any regulatory authority. and they're charging us a lot for internet access and giving us second class access. this is a lot like the electrification story from the beginning of the 20th century. initially electricity was viewed as a luxury. so when f.d.r. came in, 90% of farms didn't have electricity in america at the same time that kids in new york city were playing with electric toys. and f.d.r. understood how important it was for people all over america
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)